Packaging - Is it really necessary?

From everyday food to novel gadgets, virtually everything we use today has some form of packaging. However, the packaging is causing an environmental problem. Anything that cannot be recycled should be able to convert into renewable energy.

Trash from modern materials like plastic and Styrofoam can stay around for very long time, polluting land and sea. These materials endanger wildlife as well as humans. Add to this the fact that a huge amount of packaging is used -- and disposed of -- everyday, and the problem becomes much more serious.

The waste matter that reaches a landfill site is left to decompose. After as little as one year, the decomposed waste matter emits a natural methane-rich biogas could be used as a cheap and easily accessible green energy source. To capture biogas for using as a renewable energy, landfill sites have to be prepared with an impervious lining prior to the dumping of waste. Centrifugal compressors are used to extract the gas through vertical wells that have been drilled into the waste, and finally the gas is filtered before it is used to generate green energy. The great problem is that some of the rubbish cannot decompose naturally and is burnt. This produces carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which adds to the greenhouse effect and is one of the major causes of climate change.

Where packaging is used it should not be excessive, we have all seen situations where the outer packing is over twice the size of the contents and then the excess space has to be filled by more packaging to keep the goods secure. This is usually done to give the products a higher visibility in the store. Companies must be given some incentive to reduce this packing. If they cannot reduce the amount of packaging they use they have to be persuaded to use materials that can be recycled or decompose naturally. In doing this we can save energy or create renewable energy sources.

 

 

Green Energy Help Files is a site which offers straight explanations about renewable energy and green energy.

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